Religious Education

Religious Education Reading List

Overview

RE aims to deepen the knowledge and understanding that students have of the world's major religions, whilst also developing students into enquiring and inquisitive individuals, who are curious about the world around them.  Students are encouraged to consider, explore and discuss their own viewpoints on different ethical and philosophical issues, whilst also considering those from different religious or non-religious viewpoints.

 

In Year 7, we begin with an introductory unit on why we study RE. This then leads us onto an exploration of the Abrahamic faiths, where we learn in depth the beliefs, teachings and practices of Christianity, Judaism and Islam.

 

In Year 8, we focus on the eastern religions, where we explore the beliefs, teachings and practices of Hinduism, Buddhism and Sikhism.

 

In Year 9, we adopt a more thematic approach of study and begin to apply the various religious and non-religious beliefs to themes such as poverty and wealth, life after death and religion and society.

 

Key Stage 3  

 

In Year 7 pupils study:

  • Introduction to RE- Why do we study RE?

  • Abrahamic faiths:

o    Christian beliefs, teachings and practices

o    Islamic beliefs, teachings and practices

o    Jewish beliefs, teachings and practices

 

In Year 8 pupils study:

  • Eastern religions:

o    Hindu beliefs, teachings and practices

o    Buddhist beliefs, teachings and practices

o    Sikhism beliefs, teachings and practices

 

In Year 9 pupils study:

  • Poverty and wealth

  • Life after death

  • Religion and multiculturalism

  • Begin the GCSE in religious studies (summer term)

 

Key Stage 4

(Students will now only study for the GCSE if they have opted for it)

 

At KS4, students study for the GCSE in Religious Studies (AQA board, specification A).

The first part of the course focuses on the study of two religions; Christianity and Islam. We learn, analyse and evaluate the key beliefs, teachings and practices for each religion.

The second part of the course focuses on thematic studies, where we begin to apply religious viewpoints to ethical and philosophical issues. The themes we explore are relationships and families, the existence of God and revelation, peace and conflict, and crime and punishment.